Barclays Credit Cards

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Interesting Barclay Credit Cards


The Luxury Cards

Barclay issues a series of cards that it markets as "Luxury Cards". They aren't promoted on the regular Barclay website, but are treated almost like an independent company. For most people, these cards aren't particularly worthwhile. However, they waive the fees for members of the military. Without annual fees, these cards can be somewhat interesting--the Gold version becomes the world's most interesting no-annual-fee 2% cash-back card.

There are three versions of the card.

  • The Titanium Card. Offers 2% cash-back if you redeem by booking airline tickets. Also access to "Luxury Magazine" and the "Luxury Card Concierge". Nice looking brushed stainless steel card. $195 annual fee. Offical webpage.
  • The Black Card. Adds a $100 airline incidental credit, a $100 global entry fee credit, and a Priority Pass Select airport lounge membership for an extra $300 per year ($495 total). This card is similar to mainstream premium credit cards like the Sapphire Reserve and Citi Prestige, except that you pay more money and get less. But you get a set of unnamed "Luxury Gifts" each year. Which Premium Reward Card is Right for You? Official webpage.
  • The Gold Card. Increases the airline incidental credit to $200 and gives you an option of getting the full value of your rewards as cash-back, rather than as a credit for buying airfare. But the main difference is the card is actually plated with 24K gold. All that for only an additional $500 over the Black Card ($995) total. However, if we could get this card for free, we'd be first in line. Official webpage.

No annual fee cards (with few benefits)

In addition to the cards above, which may want to get for various reasons, Barclay offers a few additional credit cards, of which the Priceline card is the most interesting.

  • AARP Cards. There are actually two versions. The "Essentials" version gives you 3% back at gas stations and drugstores. The "Travel" version gives you 3% back on airfare, hotel stays, and car rentals. Both cards have a $100 signup bonus. Essential Version. Travel Version.
  • Apple Rewards card. 3x points on purchases from Apple and a small number of additional merchants, redeemable for 1 cent each as Apple Store or iTunes gift cards. No signup bonus. No annual fee. Not usually worth wasting a credit card application. Official webpage
  • Barnes & Noble card. 5% back on Barnes & Noble purchases, redeemable as Barnes & Noble gift cards. Plus a $25 gift card when you sign up. You can earn a free year's Barnes & Noble membership if you spend $7,500, but that isn't going to be worthwhile. No annual fee. Official webpage.
  • Carnival World card. 20,000 "FunPoints" signup bonus, good for about $160 on on-board purchases. 10% bonus FunPoints on shore excursions paid with the the credit card. No annual fee. Official webpage.
  • Diamond Resorts International card. Earns bonus points you can use to offset Diamond club, airfare, or car rental purchases. You'll get $25 worth of points when you first get the card and 2.25 cents worth of points per dollar on Diamond Resort purchases (other than down payments). No annual fee. Official webpage.
  • Holland America card. 5,000 point signup bonus (on initial purchase). Points are worth 1 cent each when used to pay for on-board amenities. No annual fee. Official webpage.
  • NFL Extra Points card. 10,000 point signup bonus ($500 initial spend). Points can be redeemed for 1 cent each. 20% discount at NFLShop.com. No annual fee. Official webpage.
  • Priceline Rewards card. 10,000 point signup bonus and earns 5x points on priceline.com purchases. Points are worth 1.1 cents each when used to offset priceline and other travel charges. This card is potentially interesting as a way to earn extra rewards on your travel purchases, such as airfare, where there isn't a significant reason not to book through Priceline. No annual fee. Official webpage.
  • Princess Cruise card. 10,000 point signup bonus (on first purchase). Points are worth 1 cent each. No annual fee. Official webpage.
  • RCI Elite Rewards card. 2,500 point signup bonus (on first purchase). No annual fee. Official webpage.
  • Upromise Mastercard. $100 signup bonus. Earns 1.25% cashback. If you link it to an eligible 529 account, the cashback rate is boosted to 1.4%. Not very interesting. Official webpage.

Barclays Rules and Tips

  • There are no limits to earning a signup bonus multiple times. If you can get approved, you can earn the bonus, regardless of how long it has been since you last had the card. However, unlike Bank of America, you usually can't get multiple versions of the same card. It is best to wait six months after cancelling a card before reapplying.
  • It can be hard to get approved for multiple cards. This is especially true if you haven't been actively using any of your current cards.
  • Barclay doesn't usually offer referral bonuses. However, they may contact you with a targeted offer.
  • Advanced details. Barclay typically uses TransUnion, the least often used credit bureau. That means that any inquiries are less likely to affect your applications with other banks. There are no fixed rules about the maximum number of cards you can apply for over any time period. If you apply for more than one card in a day, there will only be a single inquiry. They will usually match a higher signup bonus during the first month after you sign up for the card. If you ask, they will usually send the cards with priority shipping, but they may charge you a fee. Typically, if you are declined for a credit card, they will only make a soft inquiry.

If you need to talk to a representative, you can take advantage of myFico.com's list of backdoor phone numbers. These, often unpublished, phone numbers will get you directly to more experienced credit card company employees that may be better able to provide assistance.



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